Monthly Archives: June 2017

Daughter of the Dragon.

Daughter of the Dragon.

FIRST ASIAN AMERICAN STAR!
Written by PHILIP LEIBFRIED

youtu.be/fF2F2mXsRog Full Feature

Her complexion was described as "a rose blushing through old ivory;" she was beautiful, tall (5’7"), slender, and Chinese-American. The last fact kept her from attaining the highest echelon among Hollywood’s pantheon of stars, but it did not affect her popularity, nor keep her from becoming a household name. She was Anna May Wong, nee Wong Liu Tsong, a name which translates to "Frosted Yellow Willows," and she was born, appropriately enough, on Flower Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on 3 January 1905, above her father’s laundry. Anna May Wong’s contribution to show business is a unique one; she was the first Asian female to become a star, achieving that stardom at a time when bias against her race was crushing. With determination and talent allied to her exotic beauty, she remained the only Asian female star throughout her forty-year career, never fully overcoming all prejudices in maintaining that position. Perhaps the rediscovery of her art will elevate her star to the pantheon of great performers and serve as a guiding light to Asian performers who still struggle to find their rightful place. Anna May Wong’s life and career is something that is important for all who value greatly the Asian / Asian Pacific American communities’ many artists and what we can all contribute!
Excerpt from : That Old Feeling: Anna May Wong
Part II of Richard Corliss’ tribute to the pioneer Chinese-American star.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931.
Based on a Fu Manchu novel by Sax Rohmer.
Daughter of the Dragon extended the curse sworn by Dr. Fu on the Petrie family to the next generation. Fu Manchu (Warner Oland), long ago injured and exiled in an attempt on Petrie Sr., returns to London and confronts the father: "In the 20 years I have fought to live," he says in his florid maleficence, "the thought of killing you and your son has been my dearest nurse." He kills the father, is mortally wounded himself and, on his deathbed, reveals his identity to his daughter Ling Moy (Wong) and elicits her vow that she will "cancel the debt" to the Fu family honor and murder the son, Ronald (Bramwell Fletcher)… who, dash it all, is madly infatuated with Ling Moy. Ronald has seen "Princess Ling Moy Celebrated Oriental Dancer" perform, and the vision has made him woozy. "I wish I could find a word to describe her," this calf-man effuses. "Exotic that’s the word! And she’s intriguing, if you know what I mean." In a near-clinch, Ling Moy wonders if a Chinese woman can appeal to a British toff. When he begs her to "chuck everything and stay," she asks him, "If I stayed, would my hair ever become golden curls, and my skin ivory, like Ronald’s?" But the lure of the exotic is hard to shake. "Strange," he says, "I prefer yours. I shall never forget your hair and your eyes." They almost kiss … when an off-camera scream shakes him out of his dream. It is from his girlfriend Joan (Frances Dade), and the societal message is as clear and shrill: white woman alerting white man to treachery of yellow woman. Ling Moy, a nice girl, previously unaware of her lineage, might be expected to struggle, at least briefly, with the shock of her identity and the dreadful deed her father obliges her to perform. But Wong makes an instant transformation, hissing, "The blood is mine. The hatred is mine. The vengeance shall be mine." Just before his death, Fu mourns that he has no son to kill Ronald. But, in a good full-throated reading, Wong vows: "Father, father, I will be your son. I will be your son!" The audience then has the fun of watching her stoke Ronald’s ardor while plotting his death. When she is with him, pleading and salesmanship radiate from her bigeyes. But when an ally asks her why she keeps encouraging the lad, she sneers and says, "I am giving him a beautiful illusion. Which I shall crush." As a villainess, she is just getting started. Revealing her mission to Ronald, she tells him she plans to kill Joan "Because you must have a thousand bitter tastes of death before you die." (The ripe dialogue is by Hollywood neophyte Sidney Buchman, whose distinguished list of credits would include Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr Jordan and The Talk of the Town.) She soon ascends on a geyser of madness as she decides on a new torture: "My vengeance is inspired tonight. You will first have the torture of seeing her beauty eaten slowly away by this hungry acid." An aide holds a hose gadget over Joan’s soon-to-be-corroded face, and Ronald cries for Ling Moy to stop. Very well she says. "Ling Moy is merciful." She barks at Ronald: "Kill her!" He must decide if his favorite white girl is to be etched with acid or stabbed to death. Great stuff! Melodrama is the art of knowing how precisely too far to goThe film is a triangle: not so much of Ling Moy, Ronald and Joan as of Ling Moy, Ronald and a Chinese detective, Ah Kee, played by Sessue Hayakawa, the Japanese actor who in the teens was Hollywood’s first Asian male star. He’s not plausibly Chinese here, and he is in a constant, losing battle with spoken English. But he is a part of movie history, in the only studio film of the Golden Age to star two ethnically Asian actors. And he gives his emotive all to such lines as "It is the triumph of irony that the only woman I have ever deeply loved should be born of the blood that I loathe." And in the inevitable double-death finale neither the villainess nor the noble detective can survive the machinations of Hollywood justice he gently caresses the long hair of the lady he would love to have loved. "Flower Ling Moy," he says, a moment before expiring. "A flower need not love, but only be loved. As Ah Kee loved you."
The Personal Anna May Wong
This 5’7 beauty loved to study and could speak in an English accent, as well as being fluent in German and French with more than a passing knowledge of other tongues including Italian and Yiddish. For exercise she rode horses, played golf, and tennis. She liked to cook and regaled her guests with succulent Chinese dishes at frequent dinner parties. She preferred casual clothes, wearing slacks and sweaters at home, but cultivated an oriental motif in her very smart formal wardrobe. She studied singing with Welsh tenor Parry Jones before she participated in the film Limehouse Blues as George Raft’s mistress. Anna loved to dance to contemporary music. Anna was quoted as saying, "I think I got my first chance because they thought I was peculiar. But, now I like to believe that the public are fond of me because they think I’m nice."
The story of Anna May Wong’s life traced the arc of triumph and tragedy that marked so many of her films. Wong’s youthful ambition and screen appeal got her farther than anyone else of her race. But her race, or rather Hollywood’s and America’s fear of giving Chinese and other non-whites the same chance as European Americans, kept her from reaching the Golden Mountaintop. We can be startled and impressed by the success she, alone, attained. And still weask: Who knows what Anna May Wong could have been allowed to achieve if she
had been Anna May White?
Anna May Wong passed away on Feb. 3rd 1961 she was 56 years old.

Filmography:
The Red Lantern. Metro 1919. The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921.
Shame. Fox 1921. Bits of Life. Assoc. First National 1921.
The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921. Thundering Dawn. Universal 1923
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922 Drifting. Universal 1923 Fifth Avenue. PRC 1926.
Lillies of the Field. Assoc. First National 1924. The Thief of Bagdad. United Artists 1924
The Fortieth Door. Pathé serial 1924. The Alaskan. Paramount 1924.
Peter Pan. Paramount 1924. Forty Winks. Paramount 1925.
The Silk Bouquet/The Dragon Horse. Hi Mark Prod. 1926 The Desert’s Toll. MGM 1926.
A Trip to Chinatown. Fox 1926. The Chinese Parrot. Universal. 1927.
Driven from Home. Chadwick 1927. Mr. Wu. MGM 1927.
Old San Francisco. Warner Bros. 1927. Why Girls Love Sailors. Pathé short 1927.
The Devil Dancer. United Artists 1927. Streets of Shanghai. Tiffany 1927.
Across to Singapore. MGM 1928. Pavement Butterfly (aka City Butterfly).
The City Butterfly. German 1929. Across to Singapore. MGM 1928.
The Crimson City. Warner Bros. 1928. Song. German 1928
Chinatown Charlie. First National 1928. Piccadilly, British International 1929.
Elstree Calling. British International 1930. The Flame of Love. British International 1930.
Hay Tang. German 1930. L’Amour Maitre Des Choses. French 1930.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931. Shanghai Express. Paramount 1932.
A Study in Scarlet. World Wide 1933. Tiger Bay. Associated British 1933.
Chu Chin Chow. Gaumont 1934. Java Head. Associated British 1934.
Limehouse Blues. Paramount 1934. Daughter of Shanghai. Paramount 1937.
Hollywood Party. MGM short subject 1937. Dangerous to Know. Paramount 1938.
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922. The Thief of Bagdad 1924

Shanghai Express 1932

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-11-04 19:56:38

Tagged:

Mono Comme Ca

Mono Comme Ca

Visit www.foodfashfit.com for more bentos, and recipes!

On my recent trip to Japan, I picked up a few new bento boxes and accessories. In fact, I was pretty restrained until I got to Narita airport on my way home, then it all went downhill when I spotted Mono Comme Ca which had a fairly large range of bento boxes. I picked up this black onigiri box and the red chopstick holder you see here, plus a black chopstick case and a pink two-tier box. These boxes are really high quality, though a bit on the pricey side. I honestly can’t remember how much they were, though!

Inside my bento I’ve packed three onigiri with different furikake, a spicy Thai mince with lettuce leaves, and some lovely strawberries, which are just in season.

Recipe for spicy Thai mince

Ingredients
Cooking oil
½ inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, crushed
2 red chillies, deseeded and julienned
500g turkey mince
1 tsp light brown sugar
2 tbsp fish sauce
Juice of 1 lime
2 fresh, shredded lime leaves
Iceberg lettuce
Little Gem lettuce
2 shallots, finely sliced
1 extra lime for cutting into decorative slices
1 tbsp chopped coriander leaves

Method
Heat a little cooking oil in your pan and fry the ginger, garlic and half the chillies for one minute, or until they become fragrant. Add the mince and break it up as you cook, continuing to stir until it is slightly golden.
Sprinkle over the sugar, and add the fish sauce, lime juice, the shredded lime leaves and the rest of the chilli, saving some for a garnish. Cook for a few minutes until the sugar has dissolved and has made a sticky sauce. The mince should be dry when finished.
To serve, pour the mince into a bowl lined with lettuce leaves, topped with the shallots, coriander, lime slice and some reserved chillies.

Note
Like many of my recipes, you can use this to make around four adult bentos, or cook half for dinner and save the rest for your lunch. The mince is equally delicious hot or cold.

Posted by Food, Fash, Fit on 2008-06-10 13:43:12

Tagged: , Mono comme ca , onigiri , Thai , bento

Camarones Salteados 2

Camarones Salteados 2

Get the recipe and subscribe to our mailing list at: www.saludnapa.com

"This Peruvian-inspired dish has the Latin flavors that I love with a hint of Asian influence. I serve it with Quinoa to add nutritional value (protein, iron, amino acids, and more) and a traditional ‘salsa criolla’: Peru’s version of salsa. This dish is me in so many ways; bold, eclectic, health-conscious, and spicy!"

Alejandra Schrader was a top finalist on MasterChef, Season 2. Her website is www.alejandraschrader.com

ESPANOL –
Esta, mi interpretación del popular platillo peruano, tiene todos los sabores latinos que disfruto con un poco de influencia asiática. Me gusta servirlo con quínoa para añadir valor nutricional (proteína, hierro, amino ácidos, y mas) y una salsa criolla Peruana tradicional. ¡Este plato me representa en muchas formas—es atrevido, ecléctico, saludable, y picante!

Posted by salud! napa on 2012-07-09 22:10:24

Tagged: , Camarones , Salteados , shrimp , peruvian , peruano , ala , al , ajillo , alejandra , schrader , master , chef , season , two , salud , napa , saludnapa , easy , recipes , recipe , learn , how , cook , cooking , food , valley , cookbook , howto , mexican , mexico , world , eats , eat , receta , comida , cocina , video , blog , kitchen , authentic , simple , delicious , family , familia , tips , tricks , harvest , instructions , taste , lifestyle , menu , homemade , home , made , fast , healthy

Crumpets

Crumpets

I think this is the last baking photo for a little bit. Maybe. Don’t hold me to that.

I found this recipe online on another blog, which now I can’t find. It is slightly changed from that version. I believe it used half cake flour and half all purpose. I just didn’t have cake flour on hand.

Crumpets
Slightly adapted from The Bread Book by Linda Collister & Anthony Blake

Ingredients:
(makes about 18)
3 2/3 cups flour
¾ teaspoon cream of tartar
1 envelope active dry yeast (I Tbsp)
½ teaspoon sugar
2 ¼ cups warm water
1 ½ teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
2/3 cup lukewarm milk

Works best with a very flat griddle or frying pan
4-6 crumpet rings, about 3 ½ inches diameter, greased.

Instructions:

Pour yeast, sugar and ¾ cup of the warm water into big bowl and let stand until foamy, 5 to 10 minutes. Stir in the remaining 1½ cups warm water.

Sift in flour and cream of tartar, and mix, beating vigorously for two minutes. (You can do it by hand, but it is easier with a mixer.) It will be a thick, smooth batter. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let stand in a warm spot until the batter doubles and bubbles start popping, about 1 hour.

Add the salt and beat the batter for about 1 minute. Cover bowl again and let stand in a warm spot for 15 to 20 minutes, so the batter can “rest”.

Dissolve the baking soda in the lukewarm milk. Then gently stir it into the batter. The batter will be a bit bubbly and not too thick or your crumpets will be “blind” — without holes – so it is best to test one before cooking the whole batch.

Heat very clean oiled griddle or flat bottomed frying pan over medium heat for about 3 minutes until very hot. Put a well-oiled (spray vegetable oil works great) crumpet ring on the griddle. Spoon or pour 1/3 cup of the batter into the ring. The amount of batter will depend on the size of your crumpet ring.

As soon as the batter is poured into the ring, it should begin to form holes. If holes do not form, add a little more lukewarm water, a tablespoon at a time, to the batter in the bowl and try again. If the batter is too thin and runs out under the ring, gently work in a little more all-purpose flour and try again. Once the batter is the proper consistency, continue with the remaining batter, cooking the crumpets in batches, three to six at a time. As soon as the top surface is set and covered with holes, 7 to 8 minutes, the crumpet is ready to flip over.

To flip the crumpet, remove the ring with a towel or tongs, then turn the crumpet carefully with a spatula. The top, cooked side should be well browned. Cook the second, holey side of the crumpet for 2 to 3 minutes, or until pale golden. The crumpet should be about ¾ inch thick. Remove the crumpet from the griddle. If the crumpets start sticking to the rings, re-oil for next batch.

Serve right away with a drizzle of honey. Or freeze and toast later, topping with a bit of butter and honey.

Notes: If you don’t have crumpet rings, 1" deep all-metal cookie cutters will work fine. Or go to the grocery store and pick up short wide tins that can be cut open top and bottom. I found Dole Pineapple tins that were the perfect size. Tuna tins used to be perfect until they started making them with the seamless ripple bottoms that you can’t cut off any more. In kitchen stores and catalogs, crumpet rings may also go under the name of egg rings, for shaping fried eggs.

Posted by alida saxon on 2007-10-21 13:30:45

Tagged: , crumpets , yeast , flour , cooking , griddle , heat , rings , recipe , diy , honey

c1960 market traders, Baldwin Street, Bristol BS1

c1960 market traders, Baldwin Street, Bristol BS1

A busy morning scene in Baldwin Street, Bristol as market traders unload their crates of cauliflowers, cabbages, bananas, apples, and all the other items of greengrocery needed to feed the hungry shoppers of Bristol. Other shops nearby included fresh fish and who remembers the ice shop that stood on the right?

In earlier years the ice shop was no doubt successful as few businesses, shops or families owned freezers and refrigerators at that time, and the ready availability of commercially-frozen ice must have been a real boon to them. Such a business was destined for eventual failure, however, as post-war prosperity had put refrigerators within the reach of most families between the mid 1950s and early 60s; this photograph dates from April 1960.

The home freezing of garden and allotment produce, baked goods and plated meals enjoyed a lot of popularity in the 1970s. A few decades on, many working couples have little time to cook and freeze food, and for many the freezer has become little more than a storage space for quick and convenient meals. The scene was to undergo dramatic changes within a few years of this photograph; in 1968 a new fruit and vegetable market was built in St Philips Marsh, and the part of the city around Baldwin Street has become largely a business area, with a number of solicitors and accountants based here.

Posted by brizzle born and bred on 2007-11-15 15:51:39

Tagged: , 1960s , bristol market , Baldwin Street , Bristol , BS1 , UK , 1961-2007 , old-Bristol-shops , shopping , stores , UK-shops , Baldwin-Street-Bristol , Bristol-UK , market-traders

Chettinad Chicken Curry Recipe (English Subtitles) చెట్టినాడ్ చికెన్ కూర

Chettinad Chicken Curry Recipe (English Subtitles) చెట్టినాడ్ చికెన్ కూర

Chettinad Chicken Curry Recipe is well known for the flavors, which we add in the process of making the curry. Chettinad Chicken curry is a hot and spicy chicken curry from South India especially from Tamilnadu. Basically Chettinad chicken curry recipe based on the authentic recipe but these days many modern versions of this food have been derived, we can see that especially by the restaurateurs in south and north in India. Chettinad Chicken is the most popular chicken curry, you can cook in pressure cooker or if you dont have one just follow the process as shown in the video. It is shown about making Chettinad Chicken Gravy is the most popular Chettinad style chicken curry. spicy, yummy and tasty curry with mouth watering flavours. Chettinad Chicken Curry is a very special recipe in tamilnadu cuisine. To make Chettinad Chicken Curry. Learn how to make this delicious Chicken Chettinad chicken curry.

Posted by manavantillu on 2016-05-16 03:23:38

Tagged: , IFTTT , YouTube

wax beans, garlic mayo, salad greens

wax beans, garlic mayo, salad greens

Recipes used: Basic Green Beans with Garlic Mayo (337), Garlic Mayonnaise (Aioli) (59)

The wax beans I got in my Greenling delivery could be cooked the same way as regular green beans, so that’s what I did–I boiled them and then slathered them with garlic mayo. Stinkily tasty.

Posted by rutabaga_love on 2010-11-20 20:46:45

Tagged: , Deborah Madison , Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

2011 Gear

2011 Gear

Gear for a 3 person weekend trip to the gorge.

Visit my shop

Posted by Jimmymark on 2011-04-26 16:29:58

Tagged: , 2011 , Red , River , Gorge , Camp , survival , Gear , Bug out bag , BOB , Coleman , F1 , Ultralight , exponent , stove , GSI , Halulite , Solo , cookset , nesting , lightmyfire , light , fire , spork , Guyout , squishy , bowls , Energizer , headlamp , LED , flashlight , tactical , Exped , Downmat , 9 , thermarest , trail , lite , traillite , sleeping , pads , mats , bags , brunton , bushnell , binoculars , spotting , scope , monocular , recon , waterproof , tough , durable , MSR , sweetwater , purification , system , water , filter , steripen , classic , U.V. , pen , Bicyle , playing , cards , clear , plastic , deck , Eton , frs160 , emergency , radio , motorola , droid