Category Archives: Cooking gadgets

245/365 Claude

245/365 Claude

Shot on iPhone 5.
Meet Claude, my new best mate. Meggie bought him for me for father’s day and she made me a card that makes me cry every time I read it. She knows I love kitchen gadgets and things iOS. Claude holds your iPad when you’re in the kitchen, either trying to read a recipe or just look at flickr while cooking. Claude is brilliant.
I uploaded this because I wanted to mark father’s day. And because I’ve been thinking about some of the things I saw during the Bridge to Brisbane run yesterday.
I saw a girl, about three, walking in the event with her mum. The girl had a t-shirt "I’m doing this race for my daddy, RIP" and a picture of the dad she’ll never get to spend a father’s day with.
Then I saw a father pushing a wheelchair. His daughter was out of it, holding on to the chair, and walking the last few steps across the line. The father and daughter had shirts from a hospice for children – a hospice (for my flickr mates who have English as a second language) is a place that provides comfort in your dying days. That there is such a place as a children’s hospice is both an important and terrible thing.

We don’t have Thanksgiving in Australia. But on father’s day, and every day, it’s easy to remember what to be thankful for.

To my flickr mates, I’m swamped with a project for work for the next few days – and I have to go to Sydney twice in the next four days – then fly to the US for the next week. This coming week or so I’m likely to be a crap flickr mate. I want to keep uploading every day so I don’t fall behind. But I feel bad I’m unlikely to be offering any comments in return. Please don’t feel obliged to comment on my pics in the next few days given I probably won’t get the chance to return the favour.
Hopefully I’ll be back in full flickr mode soon.

Posted by chesterr on 2013-09-02 05:39:46

Tagged: , 365: the 2013 edition , 365:2013 , Day 245/365 , Day 245 , 02-Sep-13

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, 1961 Screen Captures.

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, 1961 Screen Captures.

youtu.be/LrpM4_fPIT4?t=1s Trailer
youtu.be/t5UmxJyV_bI?t=2s Theme Song.
Starring Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, Barbara Eden, Peter Lorre, Robert Sterling, Michael Ansara, Frankie Avalon, Regis Toomey, John Litel, and Henry Daniell. Directed by Irwin Allen.

Irwin Allen did not let disappointment over Lost World get him down. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (VBS) was a hit. It spawned a TV series that brought sci-fi adventure in "inner space" into millions of mid-60s living rooms. Allen provided a mix of classic Jules Verne style travel adventures with techno-gadget appeal. The story turns out to be more of a human drama than sci-fi, but the sci-fi element at least still fairly visible. There is a visual slickness to the production which heralds the coming flavor of second-generation sci-fi. VBS was also the American edition of a world cast into sudden global warming. The first was the British film The Day the Earth Caught Fire.

Synopsis
The new atomic submarine USOS Seaview has completed it’s trial voyages. A congressman and Dr. Hiller, a psychiatrist, come aboard for a demonstration voyage under the polar ice cap. The ensuing tour of the ship is as much for their benefit as for the viewers to marvel at Seaview’s coolness. After a couple of days, Seaview is being gently bombarded by falling chunks of sea ice. Seaview surfaces. The crew see that the sky is on fire. Meteorites have somehow ignited the Van Allen Belts. The earth is being scorched. Top scientists are convening at the UN to find a solution. Admiral Nelson is ordered to attend. Before they leave, they find a lone man on the ice. They take Alvarez aboard. At the UN, Nelson proposes firing a nuclear missile at the belts to "pop" them. A rival scientist says the belts will burn themselves out. The UN body likes the do-nothing plan, so Nelson storms out. They rush aboard the Seaview and speed off. Nelson plans to fire the missile anyway. The trip around South America is long enough to build some sub plots. The men are growing restive with worry about loved ones. Alvarez talks of accepting doom if that’s God’s will. Captain Crane is often at odds with Nelson over the men. Nelson gets death threats. Dr.Hiller suggests that Nelson is delusional and faked the threats. Crane is conflicted. A UN sub tries to sink them, but blows up trying to match Seaview’s diving ability. It turns out that Dr. Hiller is actually the saboteur, but she is eaten by a shark and her damage repaired. Just as the savior missile is about to be launched, Alvarez holds everyone hostage with a bomb. Crane dons scuba gear and triggers the missile manually. In the jolt of launch, Alvarez is overpowered. All are safe. The missile does the job. The fires are poofed out. Everyone reconciles their differences and sail happily for home. The End.
There is ample action and no shortage of subplots. Walter Pigeon (Morbius of Forbidden Planet (’56) ) gives a good show as the misunderstood champion. Barbara Eden (I Dream of Jeanie) does surprisingly well as more than just eye candy.

While commies aren’t present, there is the metaphor of the burning radiation belts which will soon destroy the earth. The solution is a well-placed atomic warhead. Add in some spy story sabotage, and the Cold War is well represented.

Allen positions VBS as the modern replacement for the 19th century’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Like Nemo, Admiral Nelson is lauded as the brilliant (one man) inventor/scientist and builder of the amazing submarine. Like Nemo, Nelson pursues his own inner vision of what must be done to save the world. Like Nemo, the world is out to stop him. Having Peter Lorrie among the cast makes for an unmistakable tie to Disney’s 1954 film version of the Nemo story. In VBS, his role is peripheral, but the connection works. In the TV series, Nelson’s adventures in Seaview become a modern Nemo & Nautilus for the 20th century.

Just two years after Atomic Submarine, the notion of a high-tech nuclear submarine, on adventures to save the earth, still had legs. What a difference two years made too. Where 50s films were rife with war surplus equipment, Allen’s Seaview represented more of a forward looking design.
A few movies before have suggested climate upheavals due to space phenomena. When Worlds Collide had this in 1951. The Lost Missile (’58) had a rogue missile burning up swaths of earth as it orbited. This was more of moving a local problem than global, but still… Also from 1958 was an Italo-French production, "La Morte viente dallo spazio" (Death comes from space) which had a mass of asteroids raising global temperatures. In an interesting coincidence, the english dubbed version, entitled The Day the Sky Exploded will be released only a few months after VBS. Then, there is The Day the Earth Caught Fire (‘ ) which also features a scorched earth. A cooked earth was becoming, (dare I say it?) a hot topic. (sorry) These early looks at extreme global warming have an intriguing relevance again.
The television series based upon VBS would buck the trend. Often enough, TV series based on a movie would not live up the film’s magic. Not so with VBS-TV. The series was, in many ways, better. For gadet-crazed young boys, the Flying Sub was too cool for words. The crew of Seaview, much like Roddenberry’s Enterprise crew a few years later, would take their wonderful ship on many amazing adventures. After all that, the original movie seems tame.
Note the wall of blinking square "computer" lights in the control room of Seaview. It was not new, but recycled. In the age before personal computers, someone had gone to a lot of trouble make the light-bank blink its lights in such an artful, almost thoughtful, way. It was too cool of a prop to leave in storage. It was part of the evil super computer set in Invisible Boy (’57). The light-bank appeared again in Return of the Fly (’59).

Bottom line? VBS is well worth the time. It may be a bit light on the science (or just plain wrong, such as sinking ice), but it is briskly told story that avoids predictable traps.

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-11-28 00:26:42

Tagged:

happy times :)

happy times :)

Sushi with Seaweed Salade & Nutoil Dressing and Pickled Ginger.

The past 2 days my sister in law (J.) and I, shared a hobby and went into a cooking-frenzy:)
We started off with a pot of tea and loads of cookingbooks, decided on our ‘projects’, made up our shoppinglist and then took the bus into town (Utrecht)
First stop was ‘Broodje Mario’, for a warm thick sourdough bread, packed with salami, carrot shavings, pickles, cheese and a hot pepper. Delicious!
Time for some serious shopping at ‘Betsie’s Kookwinkel’, where I bought a few cool gadgets like they use in MasterChef … a silicone mat (for making decorations with tempered chocolate), a long thin fine grater and a doughcutter 🙂
On to Simon Lévelt, coffee and tea specialists since 1817, to buy some Lapsang Souchon and Formosa Lapsang……strong smokey tea, yummy ! We love it! A. and the kids ‘ll be pleased 🙂
Short break in the sun for an ice-coffee, and then our last stop, Jac Bostelaar, specialised in American and English food!
There I at last found Liquid Glucose! Hurray !…… I’d been looking for that ever since I saw Gary Mehigan make ‘Honeycomb’ on MasterChef Australia.
Home again, J. started making ‘Kip a la bonne femme’ for our evening meal, a chicken dish, slow-cooked in a clay pot (Römertopf) in the oven.
Seeing as J. has an icecream-maker, I had a chance to try and recreate a childhood favourite; fresh mint icecream with a ripple of fresh raspberries, dipped in dark chocolate and roasted hazelnut.
With the icecream setting in the freezer and the pot in the oven, we settled down, drunk Lapsung tea and watched MasterChef recordings 🙂
Next morning, after tea and a thick slice of J.’s freshly baked bread & ginger ( still warm, so the butter melts, yummy!), it was J.’s turn at the icecream-maker for her scrumptious moccha icecream.
I had a go at chocolate tempering and got to use my new mat and doughcutter 🙂
Chocolate not bad for a 1st attempt, nice and thin, it had the ‘snap’ but missed the shine……. it was good enough to sprinkle with hazelnut and cover my icecream with 🙂
Because the 2 icecreams had needed egg-yolks, we had some eggwhites left, so J. ‘invented’ Moccha-Pavlova and popped them in the oven.
Thanks to my Bicarbonate of Soda (something any good english girl has in her kitchen-cupboard 🙂 and my newly found Liquid Glucose, we could try some ‘food-chemistry’!
The idea is that you boil sugar, water and glucose til it’s scalding hot and spotting (almost brown), and then add a spoon of Bicarb. of Soda…… instant sugar-foam ! grows to at least 10 times it’s volume within the blink of an eye !……… but our’s didn’t 🙁
It started off promissing and then collapsed and we were left with a thick syrup 🙁
Had we boiled it a little longer, it would have ‘magically turned into a HUGE chunk of sweet, crispy, goldenbrown sugarbubbles……. Honeycomb ! the stuff they fill crunchies with 🙂
There was some fresh peppermint left from my icecream-dream, so we sipped peppermint tea in the sun on J.’s roof-balcony and talked about food, while I coppied her moccha icecream recipe.
This evening I had my first delicious encounter with the Japanese kitchen. J. made Sushi !!!
I returned home tonight with my shopped goodies, half a loaf of J.’s bread & ginger, a bag full of J.’s moccha-pavlova’s, one of J.’s ‘homegrown’ tomatoplants, a belly full of J.’s great Sushi and a big smile on my face 🙂

Thank you, J.

Posted by Poekie on 2012-05-11 22:44:58

Tagged:

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, 1961 Screen Captures.

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, 1961 Screen Captures.

youtu.be/LrpM4_fPIT4?t=1s Trailer
youtu.be/t5UmxJyV_bI?t=2s Theme Song.
Starring Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, Barbara Eden, Peter Lorre, Robert Sterling, Michael Ansara, Frankie Avalon, Regis Toomey, John Litel, and Henry Daniell. Directed by Irwin Allen.

Irwin Allen did not let disappointment over Lost World get him down. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (VBS) was a hit. It spawned a TV series that brought sci-fi adventure in "inner space" into millions of mid-60s living rooms. Allen provided a mix of classic Jules Verne style travel adventures with techno-gadget appeal. The story turns out to be more of a human drama than sci-fi, but the sci-fi element at least still fairly visible. There is a visual slickness to the production which heralds the coming flavor of second-generation sci-fi. VBS was also the American edition of a world cast into sudden global warming. The first was the British film The Day the Earth Caught Fire.

Synopsis
The new atomic submarine USOS Seaview has completed it’s trial voyages. A congressman and Dr. Hiller, a psychiatrist, come aboard for a demonstration voyage under the polar ice cap. The ensuing tour of the ship is as much for their benefit as for the viewers to marvel at Seaview’s coolness. After a couple of days, Seaview is being gently bombarded by falling chunks of sea ice. Seaview surfaces. The crew see that the sky is on fire. Meteorites have somehow ignited the Van Allen Belts. The earth is being scorched. Top scientists are convening at the UN to find a solution. Admiral Nelson is ordered to attend. Before they leave, they find a lone man on the ice. They take Alvarez aboard. At the UN, Nelson proposes firing a nuclear missile at the belts to "pop" them. A rival scientist says the belts will burn themselves out. The UN body likes the do-nothing plan, so Nelson storms out. They rush aboard the Seaview and speed off. Nelson plans to fire the missile anyway. The trip around South America is long enough to build some sub plots. The men are growing restive with worry about loved ones. Alvarez talks of accepting doom if that’s God’s will. Captain Crane is often at odds with Nelson over the men. Nelson gets death threats. Dr.Hiller suggests that Nelson is delusional and faked the threats. Crane is conflicted. A UN sub tries to sink them, but blows up trying to match Seaview’s diving ability. It turns out that Dr. Hiller is actually the saboteur, but she is eaten by a shark and her damage repaired. Just as the savior missile is about to be launched, Alvarez holds everyone hostage with a bomb. Crane dons scuba gear and triggers the missile manually. In the jolt of launch, Alvarez is overpowered. All are safe. The missile does the job. The fires are poofed out. Everyone reconciles their differences and sail happily for home. The End.
There is ample action and no shortage of subplots. Walter Pigeon (Morbius of Forbidden Planet (’56) ) gives a good show as the misunderstood champion. Barbara Eden (I Dream of Jeanie) does surprisingly well as more than just eye candy.

While commies aren’t present, there is the metaphor of the burning radiation belts which will soon destroy the earth. The solution is a well-placed atomic warhead. Add in some spy story sabotage, and the Cold War is well represented.

Allen positions VBS as the modern replacement for the 19th century’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Like Nemo, Admiral Nelson is lauded as the brilliant (one man) inventor/scientist and builder of the amazing submarine. Like Nemo, Nelson pursues his own inner vision of what must be done to save the world. Like Nemo, the world is out to stop him. Having Peter Lorrie among the cast makes for an unmistakable tie to Disney’s 1954 film version of the Nemo story. In VBS, his role is peripheral, but the connection works. In the TV series, Nelson’s adventures in Seaview become a modern Nemo & Nautilus for the 20th century.

Just two years after Atomic Submarine, the notion of a high-tech nuclear submarine, on adventures to save the earth, still had legs. What a difference two years made too. Where 50s films were rife with war surplus equipment, Allen’s Seaview represented more of a forward looking design.
A few movies before have suggested climate upheavals due to space phenomena. When Worlds Collide had this in 1951. The Lost Missile (’58) had a rogue missile burning up swaths of earth as it orbited. This was more of moving a local problem than global, but still… Also from 1958 was an Italo-French production, "La Morte viente dallo spazio" (Death comes from space) which had a mass of asteroids raising global temperatures. In an interesting coincidence, the english dubbed version, entitled The Day the Sky Exploded will be released only a few months after VBS. Then, there is The Day the Earth Caught Fire (‘ ) which also features a scorched earth. A cooked earth was becoming, (dare I say it?) a hot topic. (sorry) These early looks at extreme global warming have an intriguing relevance again.
The television series based upon VBS would buck the trend. Often enough, TV series based on a movie would not live up the film’s magic. Not so with VBS-TV. The series was, in many ways, better. For gadet-crazed young boys, the Flying Sub was too cool for words. The crew of Seaview, much like Roddenberry’s Enterprise crew a few years later, would take their wonderful ship on many amazing adventures. After all that, the original movie seems tame.
Note the wall of blinking square "computer" lights in the control room of Seaview. It was not new, but recycled. In the age before personal computers, someone had gone to a lot of trouble make the light-bank blink its lights in such an artful, almost thoughtful, way. It was too cool of a prop to leave in storage. It was part of the evil super computer set in Invisible Boy (’57). The light-bank appeared again in Return of the Fly (’59).

Bottom line? VBS is well worth the time. It may be a bit light on the science (or just plain wrong, such as sinking ice), but it is briskly told story that avoids predictable traps.

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-11-28 00:26:42

Tagged:

Chu Chin Chow (Lippert, R-1953). One Sheet (27″ X 41″). Reissued as Ali Baba Nights

Chu Chin Chow (Lippert, R-1953). One Sheet (27

This British musical comedy is loosely based on the story of "Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves," and was first introduced as a London stage production, written, directed, and starring Oscar Asche. It was extremely popular with critics and audiences alike and the play ran for five years, 1916-21, a record at the time. It was then filmed in 1923, and again in 1934, this time with Anna May Wong as Zahrat Al-Kulub, Fritz Kortner as the robber captain Abu Hahan, and George Robey as Ali Baba.
FIRST ASIAN AMERICAN STAR!
Written by PHILIP LEIBFRIED

Her complexion was described as "a rose blushing through old ivory;" she was beautiful, tall (5’7"), slender, and Chinese-American. The last fact kept her from attaining the highest echelon among Hollywood’s pantheon of stars, but it did not affect her popularity, nor keep her from becoming a household name. She was Anna May Wong, nee Wong Liu Tsong, a name which translates to "Frosted Yellow Willows," and she was born, appropriately enough, on Flower Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on 3 January 1905, above her father’s laundry. Anna May Wong’s contribution to show business is a unique one; she was the first Asian female to become a star, achieving that stardom at a time when bias against her race was crushing. With determination and talent allied to her exotic beauty, she remained the only Asian female star throughout her forty-year career, never fully overcoming all prejudices in maintaining that position. Perhaps the rediscovery of her art will elevate her star to the pantheon of great performers and serve as a guiding light to Asian performers who still struggle to find their rightful place. Anna May Wong’s life and career is something that is important for all who value greatly the Asian / Asian Pacific American communities’ many artists and what we can all contribute!
Excerpt from : That Old Feeling: Anna May Wong
Part II of Richard Corliss’ tribute to the pioneer Chinese-American star.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931.
Based on a Fu Manchu novel by Sax Rohmer.
Daughter of the Dragon extended the curse sworn by Dr. Fu on the Petrie family to the next generation. Fu Manchu (Warner Oland), long ago injured and exiled in an attempt on Petrie Sr., returns to London and confronts the father: "In the 20 years I have fought to live," he says in his florid maleficence, "the thought of killing you and your son has been my dearest nurse." He kills the father, is mortally wounded himself and, on his deathbed, reveals his identity to his daughter Ling Moy (Wong) and elicits her vow that she will "cancel the debt" to the Fu family honor and murder the son, Ronald (Bramwell Fletcher)… who, dash it all, is madly infatuated with Ling Moy. Ronald has seen "Princess Ling Moy Celebrated Oriental Dancer" perform, and the vision has made him woozy. "I wish I could find a word to describe her," this calf-man effuses. "Exotic that’s the word! And she’s intriguing, if you know what I mean." In a near-clinch, Ling Moy wonders if a Chinese woman can appeal to a British toff. When he begs her to "chuck everything and stay," she asks him, "If I stayed, would my hair ever become golden curls, and my skin ivory, like Ronald’s?" But the lure of the exotic is hard to shake. "Strange," he says, "I prefer yours. I shall never forget your hair and your eyes." They almost kiss … when an off-camera scream shakes him out of his dream. It is from his girlfriend Joan (Frances Dade), and the societal message is as clear and shrill: white woman alerting white man to treachery of yellow woman. Ling Moy, a nice girl, previously unaware of her lineage, might be expected to struggle, at least briefly, with the shock of her identity and the dreadful deed her father obliges her to perform. But Wong makes an instant transformation, hissing, "The blood is mine. The hatred is mine. The vengeance shall be mine." Just before his death, Fu mourns that he has no son to kill Ronald. But, in a good full-throated reading, Wong vows: "Father, father, I will be your son. I will be your son!" The audience then has the fun of watching her stoke Ronald’s ardor while plotting his death. When she is with him, pleading and salesmanship radiate from her bigeyes. But when an ally asks her why she keeps encouraging the lad, she sneers and says, "I am giving him a beautiful illusion. Which I shall crush." As a villainess, she is just getting started. Revealing her mission to Ronald, she tells him she plans to kill Joan "Because you must have a thousand bitter tastes of death before you die." (The ripe dialogue is by Hollywood neophyte Sidney Buchman, whose distinguished list of credits would include Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr Jordan and The Talk of the Town.) She soon ascends on a geyser of madness as she decides on a new torture: "My vengeance is inspired tonight. You will first have the torture of seeing her beauty eaten slowly away by this hungry acid." An aide holds a hose gadget over Joan’s soon-to-be-corroded face, and Ronald cries for Ling Moy to stop. Very well she says. "Ling Moy is merciful." She barks at Ronald: "Kill her!" He must decide if his favorite white girl is to be etched with acid or stabbed to death. Great stuff! Melodrama is the art of knowing how precisely too far to goThe film is a triangle: not so much of Ling Moy, Ronald and Joan as of Ling Moy, Ronald and a Chinese detective, Ah Kee, played by Sessue Hayakawa, the Japanese actor who in the teens was Hollywood’s first Asian male star. He’s not plausibly Chinese here, and he is in a constant, losing battle with spoken English. But he is a part of movie history, in the only studio film of the Golden Age to star two ethnically Asian actors. And he gives his emotive all to such lines as "It is the triumph of irony that the only woman I have ever deeply loved should be born of the blood that I loathe." And in the inevitable double-death finale neither the villainess nor the noble detective can survive the machinations of Hollywood justice he gently caresses the long hair of the lady he would love to have loved. "Flower Ling Moy," he says, a moment before expiring. "A flower need not love, but only be loved. As Ah Kee loved you."
The Personal Anna May Wong
This 5’7 beauty loved to study and could speak in an English accent, as well as being fluent in German and French with more than a passing knowledge of other tongues including Italian and Yiddish. For exercise she rode horses, played golf, and tennis. She liked to cook and regaled her guests with succulent Chinese dishes at frequent dinner parties. She preferred casual clothes, wearing slacks and sweaters at home, but cultivated an oriental motif in her very smart formal wardrobe. She studied singing with Welsh tenor Parry Jones before she participated in the film Limehouse Blues as George Raft’s mistress. Anna loved to dance to contemporary music. Anna was quoted as saying, "I think I got my first chance because they thought I was peculiar. But, now I like to believe that the public are fond of me because they think I’m nice."
The story of Anna May Wong’s life traced the arc of triumph and tragedy that marked so many of her films. Wong’s youthful ambition and screen appeal got her farther than anyone else of her race. But her race, or rather Hollywood’s and America’s fear of giving Chinese and other non-whites the same chance as European Americans, kept her from reaching the Golden Mountaintop. We can be startled and impressed by the success she, alone, attained. And still weask: Who knows what Anna May Wong could have been allowed to achieve if she
had been Anna May White?
Anna May Wong passed away on Feb. 3rd 1961 she was 56 years old.

Filmography:
The Red Lantern. Metro 1919. The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921.
Shame. Fox 1921. Bits of Life. Assoc. First National 1921.
The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921. Thundering Dawn. Universal 1923
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922 Drifting. Universal 1923 Fifth Avenue. PRC 1926.
Lillies of the Field. Assoc. First National 1924. The Thief of Bagdad. United Artists 1924
The Fortieth Door. Pathé serial 1924. The Alaskan. Paramount 1924.
Peter Pan. Paramount 1924. Forty Winks. Paramount 1925.
The Silk Bouquet/The Dragon Horse. Hi Mark Prod. 1926 The Desert’s Toll. MGM 1926.
A Trip to Chinatown. Fox 1926. The Chinese Parrot. Universal. 1927.
Driven from Home. Chadwick 1927. Mr. Wu. MGM 1927.
Old San Francisco. Warner Bros. 1927. Why Girls Love Sailors. Pathé short 1927.
The Devil Dancer. United Artists 1927. Streets of Shanghai. Tiffany 1927.
Across to Singapore. MGM 1928. Pavement Butterfly (aka City Butterfly).
The City Butterfly. German 1929. Across to Singapore. MGM 1928.
The Crimson City. Warner Bros. 1928. Song. German 1928
Chinatown Charlie. First National 1928. Piccadilly, British International 1929.
Elstree Calling. British International 1930. The Flame of Love. British International 1930.
Hay Tang. German 1930. L’Amour Maitre Des Choses. French 1930.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931. Shanghai Express. Paramount 1932.
A Study in Scarlet. World Wide 1933. Tiger Bay. Associated British 1933.
Chu Chin Chow. Gaumont 1934. Java Head. Associated British 1934.
Limehouse Blues. Paramount 1934. Daughter of Shanghai. Paramount 1937.
Hollywood Party. MGM short subject 1937. Dangerous to Know. Paramount 1938.
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922. The Thief of Bagdad 1924

Shanghai Express 1932

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-10-17 22:22:57

Tagged:

Daughter of the Dragon (Paramount, 1931). Still (8″ X 10″).

Daughter of the Dragon (Paramount, 1931). Still (8

youtu.be/7Bzml6ltNh4

youtu.be/fF2F2mXsRog Full Feature

Anna May Wong, Warner Oland, Sessue Hayakawa
World-class Asian criminal genius Fu Manchu seeks retribution on the hated enemy he holds responsible for the murder of his wife and son, enlisting his equally sinister daughter until she’s diverted by a crafty Scotland yard inspector. One of the numerous Sax Rohmer screen adaptations from the early sound era.
Princess Ling Moy, a young and beautiful Chinese aristocrat lives next door, unbeknownst to her, to Dr. Fu Manchu, a brilliant but twisted genius who is out to rule the world. She is involved with Ah Kee, a handsome young man, who also unbeknownst to her, is a secret agent out to thwart the heinous plots of Fu Manchu. As it turns out, Fu is not only her next-door neighbor, he is also, (unbeknownst to her), her father. When she finds out, will she take her father’s part and fight the men out to get Fu, or will she become a brave heroine and save the world even if it is from the devious doings of her own Dad? Yes, it’s dated, and there isn’t nearly enough of Warner Oland in it; but it moves along well, has a lot of action, Wong and Hayakawa were fine actors, and if you’re a Charley Chan fan, it’s worth it to how much, if any, of Fu Oland used when creating Charley Chan.
FIRST ASIAN AMERICAN STAR!
Written by PHILIP LEIBFRIED

Her complexion was described as "a rose blushing through old ivory;" she was beautiful, tall (5’7"), slender, and Chinese-American. The last fact kept her from attaining the highest echelon among Hollywood’s pantheon of stars, but it did not affect her popularity, nor keep her from becoming a household name. She was Anna May Wong, nee Wong Liu Tsong, a name which translates to "Frosted Yellow Willows," and she was born, appropriately enough, on Flower Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on 3 January 1905, above her father’s laundry. Anna May Wong’s contribution to show business is a unique one; she was the first Asian female to become a star, achieving that stardom at a time when bias against her race was crushing. With determination and talent allied to her exotic beauty, she remained the only Asian female star throughout her forty-year career, never fully overcoming all prejudices in maintaining that position. Perhaps the rediscovery of her art will elevate her star to the pantheon of great performers and serve as a guiding light to Asian performers who still struggle to find their rightful place. Anna May Wong’s life and career is something that is important for all who value greatly the Asian / Asian Pacific American communities’ many artists and what we can all contribute!
Excerpt from : That Old Feeling: Anna May Wong
Part II of Richard Corliss’ tribute to the pioneer Chinese-American star.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931.
Based on a Fu Manchu novel by Sax Rohmer.
Daughter of the Dragon extended the curse sworn by Dr. Fu on the Petrie family to the next generation. Fu Manchu (Warner Oland), long ago injured and exiled in an attempt on Petrie Sr., returns to London and confronts the father: "In the 20 years I have fought to live," he says in his florid maleficence, "the thought of killing you and your son has been my dearest nurse." He kills the father, is mortally wounded himself and, on his deathbed, reveals his identity to his daughter Ling Moy (Wong) and elicits her vow that she will "cancel the debt" to the Fu family honor and murder the son, Ronald (Bramwell Fletcher)… who, dash it all, is madly infatuated with Ling Moy. Ronald has seen "Princess Ling Moy Celebrated Oriental Dancer" perform, and the vision has made him woozy. "I wish I could find a word to describe her," this calf-man effuses. "Exotic that’s the word! And she’s intriguing, if you know what I mean." In a near-clinch, Ling Moy wonders if a Chinese woman can appeal to a British toff. When he begs her to "chuck everything and stay," she asks him, "If I stayed, would my hair ever become golden curls, and my skin ivory, like Ronald’s?" But the lure of the exotic is hard to shake. "Strange," he says, "I prefer yours. I shall never forget your hair and your eyes." They almost kiss … when an off-camera scream shakes him out of his dream. It is from his girlfriend Joan (Frances Dade), and the societal message is as clear and shrill: white woman alerting white man to treachery of yellow woman. Ling Moy, a nice girl, previously unaware of her lineage, might be expected to struggle, at least briefly, with the shock of her identity and the dreadful deed her father obliges her to perform. But Wong makes an instant transformation, hissing, "The blood is mine. The hatred is mine. The vengeance shall be mine." Just before his death, Fu mourns that he has no son to kill Ronald. But, in a good full-throated reading, Wong vows: "Father, father, I will be your son. I will be your son!" The audience then has the fun of watching her stoke Ronald’s ardor while plotting his death. When she is with him, pleading and salesmanship radiate from her bigeyes. But when an ally asks her why she keeps encouraging the lad, she sneers and says, "I am giving him a beautiful illusion. Which I shall crush." As a villainess, she is just getting started. Revealing her mission to Ronald, she tells him she plans to kill Joan "Because you must have a thousand bitter tastes of death before you die." (The ripe dialogue is by Hollywood neophyte Sidney Buchman, whose distinguished list of credits would include Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr Jordan and The Talk of the Town.) She soon ascends on a geyser of madness as she decides on a new torture: "My vengeance is inspired tonight. You will first have the torture of seeing her beauty eaten slowly away by this hungry acid." An aide holds a hose gadget over Joan’s soon-to-be-corroded face, and Ronald cries for Ling Moy to stop. Very well she says. "Ling Moy is merciful." She barks at Ronald: "Kill her!" He must decide if his favorite white girl is to be etched with acid or stabbed to death. Great stuff! Melodrama is the art of knowing how precisely too far to goThe film is a triangle: not so much of Ling Moy, Ronald and Joan as of Ling Moy, Ronald and a Chinese detective, Ah Kee, played by Sessue Hayakawa, the Japanese actor who in the teens was Hollywood’s first Asian male star. He’s not plausibly Chinese here, and he is in a constant, losing battle with spoken English. But he is a part of movie history, in the only studio film of the Golden Age to star two ethnically Asian actors. And he gives his emotive all to such lines as "It is the triumph of irony that the only woman I have ever deeply loved should be born of the blood that I loathe." And in the inevitable double-death finale neither the villainess nor the noble detective can survive the machinations of Hollywood justice he gently caresses the long hair of the lady he would love to have loved. "Flower Ling Moy," he says, a moment before expiring. "A flower need not love, but only be loved. As Ah Kee loved you."
The Personal Anna May Wong
This 5’7 beauty loved to study and could speak in an English accent, as well as being fluent in German and French with more than a passing knowledge of other tongues including Italian and Yiddish. For exercise she rode horses, played golf, and tennis. She liked to cook and regaled her guests with succulent Chinese dishes at frequent dinner parties. She preferred casual clothes, wearing slacks and sweaters at home, but cultivated an oriental motif in her very smart formal wardrobe. She studied singing with Welsh tenor Parry Jones before she participated in the film Limehouse Blues as George Raft’s mistress. Anna loved to dance to contemporary music. Anna was quoted as saying, "I think I got my first chance because they thought I was peculiar. But, now I like to believe that the public are fond of me because they think I’m nice."
The story of Anna May Wong’s life traced the arc of triumph and tragedy that marked so many of her films. Wong’s youthful ambition and screen appeal got her farther than anyone else of her race. But her race, or rather Hollywood’s and America’s fear of giving Chinese and other non-whites the same chance as European Americans, kept her from reaching the Golden Mountaintop. We can be startled and impressed by the success she, alone, attained. And still weask: Who knows what Anna May Wong could have been allowed to achieve if she
had been Anna May White?
Anna May Wong passed away on Feb. 3rd 1961 she was 56 years old.

Filmography:
The Red Lantern. Metro 1919. The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921.
Shame. Fox 1921. Bits of Life. Assoc. First National 1921.
The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921. Thundering Dawn. Universal 1923
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922 Drifting. Universal 1923 Fifth Avenue. PRC 1926.
Lillies of the Field. Assoc. First National 1924. The Thief of Bagdad. United Artists 1924
The Fortieth Door. Pathé serial 1924. The Alaskan. Paramount 1924.
Peter Pan. Paramount 1924. Forty Winks. Paramount 1925.
The Silk Bouquet/The Dragon Horse. Hi Mark Prod. 1926 The Desert’s Toll. MGM 1926.
A Trip to Chinatown. Fox 1926. The Chinese Parrot. Universal. 1927.
Driven from Home. Chadwick 1927. Mr. Wu. MGM 1927.
Old San Francisco. Warner Bros. 1927. Why Girls Love Sailors. Pathé short 1927.
The Devil Dancer. United Artists 1927. Streets of Shanghai. Tiffany 1927.
Across to Singapore. MGM 1928. Pavement Butterfly (aka City Butterfly).
The City Butterfly. German 1929. Across to Singapore. MGM 1928.
The Crimson City. Warner Bros. 1928. Song. German 1928
Chinatown Charlie. First National 1928. Piccadilly, British International 1929.
Elstree Calling. British International 1930. The Flame of Love. British International 1930.
Hay Tang. German 1930. L’Amour Maitre Des Choses. French 1930.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931. Shanghai Express. Paramount 1932.
A Study in Scarlet. World Wide 1933. Tiger Bay. Associated British 1933.
Chu Chin Chow. Gaumont 1934. Java Head. Associated British 1934.
Limehouse Blues. Paramount 1934. Daughter of Shanghai. Paramount 1937.
Hollywood Party. MGM short subject 1937. Dangerous to Know. Paramount 1938.
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922. The Thief of Bagdad 1924

Shanghai Express 1932

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-10-17 22:23:18

Tagged:

Shanghai Express (Paramount, 1932). Lobby Card (11″ X 14″)

Shanghai Express (Paramount, 1932). Lobby Card (11

Initially banned in China, the Chinese government demanded this film’s withdrawal from worldwide circulation. The ban was lifted when Paramount pledged not to make another film involving Chinese politics. This sparked the beginning of big business for Paramount with this box office hit. Joseph Von Sternberg directs his protege, Marlene Dietrich, for the fourth time in this story of a group of passengers on board the Shanghai Express during the Chinese civil war.
FIRST ASIAN AMERICAN STAR!
Written by PHILIP LEIBFRIED

Her complexion was described as "a rose blushing through old ivory;" she was beautiful, tall (5’7"), slender, and Chinese-American. The last fact kept her from attaining the highest echelon among Hollywood’s pantheon of stars, but it did not affect her popularity, nor keep her from becoming a household name. She was Anna May Wong, nee Wong Liu Tsong, a name which translates to "Frosted Yellow Willows," and she was born, appropriately enough, on Flower Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on 3 January 1905, above her father’s laundry. Anna May Wong’s contribution to show business is a unique one; she was the first Asian female to become a star, achieving that stardom at a time when bias against her race was crushing. With determination and talent allied to her exotic beauty, she remained the only Asian female star throughout her forty-year career, never fully overcoming all prejudices in maintaining that position. Perhaps the rediscovery of her art will elevate her star to the pantheon of great performers and serve as a guiding light to Asian performers who still struggle to find their rightful place. Anna May Wong’s life and career is something that is important for all who value greatly the Asian / Asian Pacific American communities’ many artists and what we can all contribute!
Excerpt from : That Old Feeling: Anna May Wong
Part II of Richard Corliss’ tribute to the pioneer Chinese-American star.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931.
Based on a Fu Manchu novel by Sax Rohmer.
Daughter of the Dragon extended the curse sworn by Dr. Fu on the Petrie family to the next generation. Fu Manchu (Warner Oland), long ago injured and exiled in an attempt on Petrie Sr., returns to London and confronts the father: "In the 20 years I have fought to live," he says in his florid maleficence, "the thought of killing you and your son has been my dearest nurse." He kills the father, is mortally wounded himself and, on his deathbed, reveals his identity to his daughter Ling Moy (Wong) and elicits her vow that she will "cancel the debt" to the Fu family honor and murder the son, Ronald (Bramwell Fletcher)… who, dash it all, is madly infatuated with Ling Moy. Ronald has seen "Princess Ling Moy Celebrated Oriental Dancer" perform, and the vision has made him woozy. "I wish I could find a word to describe her," this calf-man effuses. "Exotic that’s the word! And she’s intriguing, if you know what I mean." In a near-clinch, Ling Moy wonders if a Chinese woman can appeal to a British toff. When he begs her to "chuck everything and stay," she asks him, "If I stayed, would my hair ever become golden curls, and my skin ivory, like Ronald’s?" But the lure of the exotic is hard to shake. "Strange," he says, "I prefer yours. I shall never forget your hair and your eyes." They almost kiss … when an off-camera scream shakes him out of his dream. It is from his girlfriend Joan (Frances Dade), and the societal message is as clear and shrill: white woman alerting white man to treachery of yellow woman. Ling Moy, a nice girl, previously unaware of her lineage, might be expected to struggle, at least briefly, with the shock of her identity and the dreadful deed her father obliges her to perform. But Wong makes an instant transformation, hissing, "The blood is mine. The hatred is mine. The vengeance shall be mine." Just before his death, Fu mourns that he has no son to kill Ronald. But, in a good full-throated reading, Wong vows: "Father, father, I will be your son. I will be your son!" The audience then has the fun of watching her stoke Ronald’s ardor while plotting his death. When she is with him, pleading and salesmanship radiate from her bigeyes. But when an ally asks her why she keeps encouraging the lad, she sneers and says, "I am giving him a beautiful illusion. Which I shall crush." As a villainess, she is just getting started. Revealing her mission to Ronald, she tells him she plans to kill Joan "Because you must have a thousand bitter tastes of death before you die." (The ripe dialogue is by Hollywood neophyte Sidney Buchman, whose distinguished list of credits would include Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr Jordan and The Talk of the Town.) She soon ascends on a geyser of madness as she decides on a new torture: "My vengeance is inspired tonight. You will first have the torture of seeing her beauty eaten slowly away by this hungry acid." An aide holds a hose gadget over Joan’s soon-to-be-corroded face, and Ronald cries for Ling Moy to stop. Very well she says. "Ling Moy is merciful." She barks at Ronald: "Kill her!" He must decide if his favorite white girl is to be etched with acid or stabbed to death. Great stuff! Melodrama is the art of knowing how precisely too far to goThe film is a triangle: not so much of Ling Moy, Ronald and Joan as of Ling Moy, Ronald and a Chinese detective, Ah Kee, played by Sessue Hayakawa, the Japanese actor who in the teens was Hollywood’s first Asian male star. He’s not plausibly Chinese here, and he is in a constant, losing battle with spoken English. But he is a part of movie history, in the only studio film of the Golden Age to star two ethnically Asian actors. And he gives his emotive all to such lines as "It is the triumph of irony that the only woman I have ever deeply loved should be born of the blood that I loathe." And in the inevitable double-death finale neither the villainess nor the noble detective can survive the machinations of Hollywood justice he gently caresses the long hair of the lady he would love to have loved. "Flower Ling Moy," he says, a moment before expiring. "A flower need not love, but only be loved. As Ah Kee loved you."
The Personal Anna May Wong
This 5’7 beauty loved to study and could speak in an English accent, as well as being fluent in German and French with more than a passing knowledge of other tongues including Italian and Yiddish. For exercise she rode horses, played golf, and tennis. She liked to cook and regaled her guests with succulent Chinese dishes at frequent dinner parties. She preferred casual clothes, wearing slacks and sweaters at home, but cultivated an oriental motif in her very smart formal wardrobe. She studied singing with Welsh tenor Parry Jones before she participated in the film Limehouse Blues as George Raft’s mistress. Anna loved to dance to contemporary music. Anna was quoted as saying, "I think I got my first chance because they thought I was peculiar. But, now I like to believe that the public are fond of me because they think I’m nice."
The story of Anna May Wong’s life traced the arc of triumph and tragedy that marked so many of her films. Wong’s youthful ambition and screen appeal got her farther than anyone else of her race. But her race, or rather Hollywood’s and America’s fear of giving Chinese and other non-whites the same chance as European Americans, kept her from reaching the Golden Mountaintop. We can be startled and impressed by the success she, alone, attained. And still weask: Who knows what Anna May Wong could have been allowed to achieve if she
had been Anna May White?
Anna May Wong passed away on Feb. 3rd 1961 she was 56 years old.

Filmography:
The Red Lantern. Metro 1919. The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921.
Shame. Fox 1921. Bits of Life. Assoc. First National 1921.
The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921. Thundering Dawn. Universal 1923
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922 Drifting. Universal 1923 Fifth Avenue. PRC 1926.
Lillies of the Field. Assoc. First National 1924. The Thief of Bagdad. United Artists 1924
The Fortieth Door. Pathé serial 1924. The Alaskan. Paramount 1924.
Peter Pan. Paramount 1924. Forty Winks. Paramount 1925.
The Silk Bouquet/The Dragon Horse. Hi Mark Prod. 1926 The Desert’s Toll. MGM 1926.
A Trip to Chinatown. Fox 1926. The Chinese Parrot. Universal. 1927.
Driven from Home. Chadwick 1927. Mr. Wu. MGM 1927.
Old San Francisco. Warner Bros. 1927. Why Girls Love Sailors. Pathé short 1927.
The Devil Dancer. United Artists 1927. Streets of Shanghai. Tiffany 1927.
Across to Singapore. MGM 1928. Pavement Butterfly (aka City Butterfly).
The City Butterfly. German 1929. Across to Singapore. MGM 1928.
The Crimson City. Warner Bros. 1928. Song. German 1928
Chinatown Charlie. First National 1928. Piccadilly, British International 1929.
Elstree Calling. British International 1930. The Flame of Love. British International 1930.
Hay Tang. German 1930. L’Amour Maitre Des Choses. French 1930.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931. Shanghai Express. Paramount 1932.
A Study in Scarlet. World Wide 1933. Tiger Bay. Associated British 1933.
Chu Chin Chow. Gaumont 1934. Java Head. Associated British 1934.
Limehouse Blues. Paramount 1934. Daughter of Shanghai. Paramount 1937.
Hollywood Party. MGM short subject 1937. Dangerous to Know. Paramount 1938.
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922. The Thief of Bagdad 1924

Shanghai Express 1932

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-10-17 22:23:10

Tagged:

Dangerous to Know (Paramount, 1938). One Sheet (27″ X 41″).

Dangerous to Know (Paramount, 1938). One Sheet (27

Anna May Wong, Akim Tamiroff, Gail Patrick and Lloyd Nolan star in this thrilling crime drama.Based on a play by Edgar Wallace.
Racketeer Steve Recka, art patron and political power-maker, rules his town and Madame Lan Ying, his beautiful Oriental friend and hostess (read: mistress), with an iron hand. He meets Margaret Van Kase, a socialite not impressed by his power nor his wealth, having no money herself, and Steve makes frantic efforts to win her and turns away from the loyal Lin Yang. Margaret ignores him as she plans to wed Philip Easton, a penniless bond salesman. The furious Recka, poses as a friend to Easton, while planning to ruin him. His henchmen kidnap Easton when he is carrying a large assignment of bonds, and he is branded as a runaway thief. The only doubters are Margaret and Police Inspector Brandon, who knows Recka’s methods and suspects foul play. Easton is found in an abandoned house and arrested as the gangsters have taken the bonds and tipped the police where to find him. Recka offers to clear Easton if Margaret will become his bride and, while her hatred for Recka is intense, her love
FIRST ASIAN AMERICAN STAR!
Written by PHILIP LEIBFRIED

Her complexion was described as "a rose blushing through old ivory;" she was beautiful, tall (5’7"), slender, and Chinese-American. The last fact kept her from attaining the highest echelon among Hollywood’s pantheon of stars, but it did not affect her popularity, nor keep her from becoming a household name. She was Anna May Wong, nee Wong Liu Tsong, a name which translates to "Frosted Yellow Willows," and she was born, appropriately enough, on Flower Street in Los Angeles’ Chinatown on 3 January 1905, above her father’s laundry. Anna May Wong’s contribution to show business is a unique one; she was the first Asian female to become a star, achieving that stardom at a time when bias against her race was crushing. With determination and talent allied to her exotic beauty, she remained the only Asian female star throughout her forty-year career, never fully overcoming all prejudices in maintaining that position. Perhaps the rediscovery of her art will elevate her star to the pantheon of great performers and serve as a guiding light to Asian performers who still struggle to find their rightful place. Anna May Wong’s life and career is something that is important for all who value greatly the Asian / Asian Pacific American communities’ many artists and what we can all contribute!
Excerpt from : That Old Feeling: Anna May Wong
Part II of Richard Corliss’ tribute to the pioneer Chinese-American star.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931.
Based on a Fu Manchu novel by Sax Rohmer.
Daughter of the Dragon extended the curse sworn by Dr. Fu on the Petrie family to the next generation. Fu Manchu (Warner Oland), long ago injured and exiled in an attempt on Petrie Sr., returns to London and confronts the father: "In the 20 years I have fought to live," he says in his florid maleficence, "the thought of killing you and your son has been my dearest nurse." He kills the father, is mortally wounded himself and, on his deathbed, reveals his identity to his daughter Ling Moy (Wong) and elicits her vow that she will "cancel the debt" to the Fu family honor and murder the son, Ronald (Bramwell Fletcher)… who, dash it all, is madly infatuated with Ling Moy. Ronald has seen "Princess Ling Moy Celebrated Oriental Dancer" perform, and the vision has made him woozy. "I wish I could find a word to describe her," this calf-man effuses. "Exotic that’s the word! And she’s intriguing, if you know what I mean." In a near-clinch, Ling Moy wonders if a Chinese woman can appeal to a British toff. When he begs her to "chuck everything and stay," she asks him, "If I stayed, would my hair ever become golden curls, and my skin ivory, like Ronald’s?" But the lure of the exotic is hard to shake. "Strange," he says, "I prefer yours. I shall never forget your hair and your eyes." They almost kiss … when an off-camera scream shakes him out of his dream. It is from his girlfriend Joan (Frances Dade), and the societal message is as clear and shrill: white woman alerting white man to treachery of yellow woman. Ling Moy, a nice girl, previously unaware of her lineage, might be expected to struggle, at least briefly, with the shock of her identity and the dreadful deed her father obliges her to perform. But Wong makes an instant transformation, hissing, "The blood is mine. The hatred is mine. The vengeance shall be mine." Just before his death, Fu mourns that he has no son to kill Ronald. But, in a good full-throated reading, Wong vows: "Father, father, I will be your son. I will be your son!" The audience then has the fun of watching her stoke Ronald’s ardor while plotting his death. When she is with him, pleading and salesmanship radiate from her bigeyes. But when an ally asks her why she keeps encouraging the lad, she sneers and says, "I am giving him a beautiful illusion. Which I shall crush." As a villainess, she is just getting started. Revealing her mission to Ronald, she tells him she plans to kill Joan "Because you must have a thousand bitter tastes of death before you die." (The ripe dialogue is by Hollywood neophyte Sidney Buchman, whose distinguished list of credits would include Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr Jordan and The Talk of the Town.) She soon ascends on a geyser of madness as she decides on a new torture: "My vengeance is inspired tonight. You will first have the torture of seeing her beauty eaten slowly away by this hungry acid." An aide holds a hose gadget over Joan’s soon-to-be-corroded face, and Ronald cries for Ling Moy to stop. Very well she says. "Ling Moy is merciful." She barks at Ronald: "Kill her!" He must decide if his favorite white girl is to be etched with acid or stabbed to death. Great stuff! Melodrama is the art of knowing how precisely too far to goThe film is a triangle: not so much of Ling Moy, Ronald and Joan as of Ling Moy, Ronald and a Chinese detective, Ah Kee, played by Sessue Hayakawa, the Japanese actor who in the teens was Hollywood’s first Asian male star. He’s not plausibly Chinese here, and he is in a constant, losing battle with spoken English. But he is a part of movie history, in the only studio film of the Golden Age to star two ethnically Asian actors. And he gives his emotive all to such lines as "It is the triumph of irony that the only woman I have ever deeply loved should be born of the blood that I loathe." And in the inevitable double-death finale neither the villainess nor the noble detective can survive the machinations of Hollywood justice he gently caresses the long hair of the lady he would love to have loved. "Flower Ling Moy," he says, a moment before expiring. "A flower need not love, but only be loved. As Ah Kee loved you."
The Personal Anna May Wong
This 5’7 beauty loved to study and could speak in an English accent, as well as being fluent in German and French with more than a passing knowledge of other tongues including Italian and Yiddish. For exercise she rode horses, played golf, and tennis. She liked to cook and regaled her guests with succulent Chinese dishes at frequent dinner parties. She preferred casual clothes, wearing slacks and sweaters at home, but cultivated an oriental motif in her very smart formal wardrobe. She studied singing with Welsh tenor Parry Jones before she participated in the film Limehouse Blues as George Raft’s mistress. Anna loved to dance to contemporary music. Anna was quoted as saying, "I think I got my first chance because they thought I was peculiar. But, now I like to believe that the public are fond of me because they think I’m nice."
The story of Anna May Wong’s life traced the arc of triumph and tragedy that marked so many of her films. Wong’s youthful ambition and screen appeal got her farther than anyone else of her race. But her race, or rather Hollywood’s and America’s fear of giving Chinese and other non-whites the same chance as European Americans, kept her from reaching the Golden Mountaintop. We can be startled and impressed by the success she, alone, attained. And still weask: Who knows what Anna May Wong could have been allowed to achieve if she
had been Anna May White?
Anna May Wong passed away on Feb. 3rd 1961 she was 56 years old.

Filmography:
The Red Lantern. Metro 1919. The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921.
Shame. Fox 1921. Bits of Life. Assoc. First National 1921.
The First Born. Robertson Cole 1921. Thundering Dawn. Universal 1923
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922 Drifting. Universal 1923 Fifth Avenue. PRC 1926.
Lillies of the Field. Assoc. First National 1924. The Thief of Bagdad. United Artists 1924
The Fortieth Door. Pathé serial 1924. The Alaskan. Paramount 1924.
Peter Pan. Paramount 1924. Forty Winks. Paramount 1925.
The Silk Bouquet/The Dragon Horse. Hi Mark Prod. 1926 The Desert’s Toll. MGM 1926.
A Trip to Chinatown. Fox 1926. The Chinese Parrot. Universal. 1927.
Driven from Home. Chadwick 1927. Mr. Wu. MGM 1927.
Old San Francisco. Warner Bros. 1927. Why Girls Love Sailors. Pathé short 1927.
The Devil Dancer. United Artists 1927. Streets of Shanghai. Tiffany 1927.
Across to Singapore. MGM 1928. Pavement Butterfly (aka City Butterfly).
The City Butterfly. German 1929. Across to Singapore. MGM 1928.
The Crimson City. Warner Bros. 1928. Song. German 1928
Chinatown Charlie. First National 1928. Piccadilly, British International 1929.
Elstree Calling. British International 1930. The Flame of Love. British International 1930.
Hay Tang. German 1930. L’Amour Maitre Des Choses. French 1930.
Daughter of the Dragon. Paramount 1931. Shanghai Express. Paramount 1932.
A Study in Scarlet. World Wide 1933. Tiger Bay. Associated British 1933.
Chu Chin Chow. Gaumont 1934. Java Head. Associated British 1934.
Limehouse Blues. Paramount 1934. Daughter of Shanghai. Paramount 1937.
Hollywood Party. MGM short subject 1937. Dangerous to Know. Paramount 1938.
The Toll of the Sea. Metro 1922. The Thief of Bagdad 1924

Shanghai Express 1932

Posted by Morbius19 on 2013-10-17 22:22:53

Tagged:

Vintage Kitchen Hand Mixer

Vintage Kitchen Hand Mixer

I adore kitchen gizmos and gadgets! I may need to join a 12 Step Program for my little problem.

Posted by SurrendrDorothy on 2008-05-18 12:17:54

Tagged: , red , mixer , hand , gadget , cool , egg , beater , cooking , housewife , kitchen , classic , fun , bake , baking , donna , reed , HRMB , Raymond Maine , Maine , old , antique , 40s , Forties , handmade , Mainemade , love , handcrafted , OOAK , USA , 1950s , Fifties , womanmade , Artisan , BoHo , hippie , unique , fashion , casual , Earthy , decor , homegoods , Etsy , Artfire , Bag , Purse , vintage , HerRoyalMajestyBags , Zibbet , SurrenderDorothy , home decor , 50s , Mid Century , 1940s

A Great Big Beautiful Christmas

A Great Big Beautiful Christmas

If I can’t see this in person a few days before Christmas, the next best thing will be to experience it today in photos (with more below)!

Walt Disney World | Magic Kingdom | Carousel of Progress

______________________________________________________________________________

FATHER: Isn’t it a pleasant holiday? Turkey’s in the oven, it’s peaceful and quiet.

JIMMY: Yes! Three hundred points, my best score yet!

SARAH: Well, it was peaceful until Santa brought that new virtual reality space pilot game.

Jimmy’s headgear goes up above his eyes.

JIMMY: Your turn Grandma. Let’s switch the image over to the TV, so the resident flying ace can show you how it works.

Grandma’s headgear goes down, and the TV turns on. On the TV we see the interior of a space craft cockpit.

JIMMY: Now, it’s a little tricky. Just use your game glove to fly behind the other guy and then blast him with your laser blaster!

GRANDMA: Laser blaster? Well, I’ll give it a try.

JIMMY: Take a look around Grandma. You’re in the ship.

GRANDMA: I feel like I’m really there!

JIMMY: Okay, get ready, you’re about to blast off!

GRANDMA: Here goes nothing.

The screen flickers into motion as the space outside of the cockpit begins to move. We soon see enemy ships passing by.

JIMMY: Alright, here he comes! Ooh, you missed him.

As Grandma and Jimmy play Space Pilot, Sarah looks up from her computer.

SARAH: Hey everyone, I’m done programming out new voice activation system.

FATHER: Now all our household items will do anything we tell them to do.

GRANDPA: Great… tell the refrigerator to bring me a root beer.

SARAH: (Chuckling.) Well, it can’t quite do that. But I’ll show you something that it can do. (She declares:) Tree lights, thirty percent brighter.

The Christmas Tree lights brighten a little.

GRANDPA: Ah, that’s no big deal. Anybody can do that voice activating stuff. Watch this. Rover… speak!

ROVER: Woof!

SARAH: John, the oven should respond to your voice commands now. Give it a try.

FATHER: Okay, here goes. Temperature to 375.

OVEN: (It actually talks.) Temperature increased to 375.

PATRICIA: Look at that! It even talks back.

FATHER: Like some people I know.

PATRICIA: Yeah right dad!

JIMMY: (Watching Grandma’s progress on the TV.) You’re going to loose him Grandma! Bank to the right!

PATRICIA: Remember dad’s turkey last year?

GRANDPA: Yeah, that thing really smoked up the place when it burned, didn’t it?

PATRICIA: We ended up microwaving frozen pizzas.

SARAH: Well, no need to worry about the turkey this year. Not with an oven that will do anything your father tells it to do.

JIMMY: Ooo! Good shot!

GRANDMA: Did you see that?!

JIMMY: Dad, Grandma’s up to 550 points!

FATHER: Did you say 550? Man, she’s getting the hang of that thing.

OVEN: (Quietly, without anyone noticing.) Temperature increased to 550.

GRANDPA: I can’t believe all the new gadgets they’ve got now. Did you know in my day–

PATRICIA: Oh no. You’re not going to tell us about the old days when you didn’t even have a car phone.

GRANDPA: (He chuckles.) Hey Trisch, for a while we didn’t even have a house phone. Not to mention laser discs and high def TV. Everything is automated these days, including…

From off stage we hear a toilet flushing.

GRANDPA: (Continuing.) Well, including that.

COUSIN ORVILLE: (Off stage.) No privacy at all around this place!

GRANDPA: Sorry Orville. Anyway, you guys don’t realize how good you’ve got it nowadays.

SARAH: You know, my Grandfather told me the very same thing when I was a kid.

GRANDMA: (Still playing the VR.) Take that you nincompoop!

JIMMY: Hey check it out dad. Grandma’s up to 975 points.

FATHER: Wow! 975.

OVEN: Temperature increased to 975. (Oven starts beeping and smoke erupts.) Overload– overload…

SARAH: John, what’s wrong with the oven?

FATHER: Well– UH…

The oven door slams open and we hear the crackling of burnt turkey skin.

OVEN: Bake Mode complete. Enjoy your meal.

PATRICIA: Anyone for pizza?

SARAH: Another Christmas turkey ruined.

Grandma’s game ends. Her headgear lifts back over her eyes.

GRANDMA: Man what a game! I really smoked those guys. Looks like I’m resident flying ace now.

JIMMY: Best two out of three Grandma?

GRANDMA: Later kid. Boy that was fun. What will they think up next?

PATRICIA: Who knows? We’ve got a whole new century waiting for us out there.

SARAH: Yeah, and maybe sometime in the new century, your father will learn how to talk to out oven.

FATHER: Well, by then maybe ovens will read out minds. But hey, as long as we’re all here and happy and together for the holidays, who cares if I burned out Christmas turkey?

GRANDMA: I do! I’m starving.

A round of laughter erupts from the whole family.

JIMMY: Don’t worry dad. Someday, everything is going to be so automated, you won’t ever have to cook another Christmas turkey again.

From carouselofprogress.tripod.com/dscript2.html

Posted by Brett Kiger on 2012-12-22 15:04:04

Tagged: , Walt , Disney , World , WDW , Magic , Kingdom , Carousel , Progress , Christmas , Olympus , OM-D , E-M5 , 45mm